ningyoprints

Notes from ningyo editions studio and gallery

The Memento Mori and Jane Rainwater’s Evil Flowers

“When the cities are on fire with the burning flesh of men, just remember that death is not the end.”

-Bob Dylan

“…and tell ’em to bring some of them sweet smelling roses/so they can’t smell me as we ride along.”

-old folk ballad (“St. James Hospital”)

Memento Mori roughly translates as “Remember you will die”. Read the rest of this entry »

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Joe Wardwell: If This Is It

And I know soon/ that the sky will split
And the planets will shift,
Balls of jade will drop/ and existence stop.

-Patti Smith

Preamble

The readership has come to expect a certain level of quality in this little blog, though in referring to the “readership”, I actually have reason to believe that this really just includes myself alone (as a quick check on my WordPress dashboard stats confirm.)   As sad as this makes me (which on a scale of 1 to 10 is a 5) I feel like I must continue to post at least once in a while because what is more sad –  like a 7 or an 8 – is visiting a blog that has not been updated for a year or more.  You briefly wonder if the person has become very ill or even died, then determine that more likely he or she just got lazy: the passion withered and creeping realizations of the futility of the whole effort set in and eventually won out.  All maybe less sad than death, but still depressing, and each representing a kind of death in themselves.

Having said all of that, I give myself a pass to write a bit lazily on the excellent Boston artist Joe Wardwell, for which I believe he of all people will understand. Read the rest of this entry »

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Jennifer Koch’s Scissor Drawings

The Chinese were printing on paper with woodblocks over a thousand years before most Europeans even knew what a piece of paper was, and before they were printing on it they were cutting it.  So begins an ongoing history with styles and techniques developing independent of one another across continents and hemispheres, yet all inspired by a bounding line created from a deeply contrasting, shadowed edge and the sheer dramatic impact of the silhouette. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Editions (from ningyo editions), Uncategorized

Kathleen O’Hara

The ubiquity of greeting cards throughout Kathleen O’Hara’s childhood and adult life (her parents own a greeting card company) has naturally found its way into her work, as evinced in landscapes that manage to be at once quaint and eerie.  Other influences include film stills, collectibles, catalogues, and newspapers (images of which are often collaged directly onto the work.)  Despite the benign scenes that influence her work, her landscapes are often altered to highlight disquieting features such as angry dark clouds or silent, colossal icebergs.  These inimical features imbue quaint idylls with the awe and terror that the Romantics felt towards the forces of nature.

Newfoundland, 2010, acrylic, marker, pencil, collage on canvas, 24×30”

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Editions (from ningyo editions), Uncategorized

Holoplanktonica – Plastic Impressions of Ocean Flotsam

Deb Todd Wheeler spent the first several weeks of 2011 at ningyo editions creating Holoplanktonica, a series of prints inspired by the 2004 exhibition Ocean Flowers: Impressions from Nature curated by Catherine De Zegher at The Drawing Center in New York.  That exhibit collected a vast trove of 19th century prints, color plates, imprints, cyanotypes, and early photograms – “as ‘twere in Granf’r’s day” – of oceanic vegetation by artists and botanists alike.  This new series collects an equally diverse trove of monotypes, collograph, woodcut and letterpress prints cataloging specimens of modern-day detritus resulting from plastic refuse accumulating on land and sea alike.  (See also the Urban Dictionary’s definition for Urban Jellyfish)

Deb Todd Wheeler detritus

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Editions (from ningyo editions)

Jane D. Marsching’s Ice Out, and also the first post

To read descriptions on how prints are made is generally hopelessly boring to all but the most curious technicians, and in most cases the same should be said about writing them.

But the creation of Ice Out presented conceptual challenges that dictated new and unfamiliar technical means: how to depict the gradual melting of the ice-covered Walden across a small series of images that would bring the viewer from the crystalline chill of the frozen surface to the verdant expanse of spring’s eventual triumph; how to depict data which records a process so un-visual as comparisons of wind speed and direction; and how to present both expansive tone and color with the minutiae of this data in a balanced, harmonious, and equally engaging manner. This makes at least the task of writing about technique far more engaging. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Editions (from ningyo editions), Uncategorized

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