ningyoprints

Notes from ningyo editions studio and gallery

Lobby Card: #5 : Short Cuts

david curcio

Lobby Card: Short Cuts

An “Altman-esque” film on every level (giant ensemble cast with lives and plot lines intersecting  unexpectedly ),  Short Cuts is (loosely) based on six Raymond Carver short stories and a poem.  Altman moves the action from Carver’s Pacific Northwest to sun-drenched LA, turning the city into a microcosm of humanity, where butterfly effects abound and the interactions of the disparate characters have repercussions of which they are wholly unaware, sometimes with devastating consequences. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Lobby Card Series, , , ,

Lobby Card #4: The Spy Who Came in From the Cold

david curcio

Lobby Card: The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

     The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a gloomy, cheerless and ultimately heartbreaking story of the lugubrious, slow-paced monotony of real life espionage.  Based on the early John Le Carre novel, Richard Burton plays Alex Lemus, a British agent during the Cold War waiting for his marching orders: to defect to East Germany and provide false information to an odious German anti-Semite working as a British double-agent.  In the meantime, he lives out his lonely, booze-soaked life in England. Read the rest of this entry »

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Lobby Card #3: The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans

David Curcio

Lobby Card: Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009)

A freakish, baffling anomaly of a film, Bad Lieutenant Port of Call New Orleans is Werner Herzog’s vague reimagining of Abel Ferrara’s 1992 masterpiece, albeit perhaps in name only (he denies having ever seen Ferrara’s version, although a few variations on certain scenes indicate he knew key scenes and plot points well enough).  Nicholas Cage , in a career-saving, dignity-restoring performance plays Terence McDonagh (Keitel’s character of the original- which is the subject of another Lobby Card – is unnamed), a cop who develops a Vicodin habit after harming his back as a result of an act of  valor during Hurricane Katrina. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Lobby Card Series, , , ,

Lobby Card #2: Time Bandits

david curcio

Lobby Card: Time Bandits, 2013 15 x 11.5, drypoint, woodcut, colored pencil and embroidered border

I was nine years old when I saw Time Bandits, and what I saw were arms being ripped off then thrown into a giant pile of other arms; old ladies getting punched in the face with full and brutal force; a man hanging himself by accident; a villain who destroys his obsequious, moronic sidekicks for the most naive infractions.  And of course I was riveted, albeit with one foot cocked for a quick escape should things get really ugly.  And they did, right up to the final shot when our young child-hero’s parents are blown to bits by a smoldering piece of Evil, but I never even considered leaving, even to take a piss.  This story spoke to children in a way Superman or Raiders of the Lost Ark never could, because, unlike the messages inherent in those films, we really weren’t certain that things would turn out alright.  And of course they never quite do. Read the rest of this entry »

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Lobby Card Series #1: Whose Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

lc_whos_afraid

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was director Mike Nichols’ first movie, and it locks the viewer into a claustrophobic train wreck of an evening fueled by booze and long-simmering resentments (which in turn are fueled by more booze).  The college president’s daughter (Elizabeth Taylor) and her brow-beaten, pathetically under-achieving husband (Richard Burton) whose years in the history department have reduced him to academic deadwood seemingly do nothing but drink, fight and banter.  When a new, young biology teacher and his meek simp of a wife stop by for drinks at 2 am, the night veers into hissing recriminations and devastating revelations for all involved. Read the rest of this entry »

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The (Partially Aborted) Munch Lecture: Part 4 (The Scream)

“Did you ever hear the cry of heaven?  No?  Well, let me tell you I did, I saw heaven crying;  It seemed as if the whole sky opened its thousands of mouths and hurled down molten colors into space.  The whole sky, an endless expanse of stripes ranging in color from from dark red to black.  Congealed blood – no, a pool reflecting a purple sunset, and then dirty gold.  Ugly, disgusting, but superb.”

-From Munch’s friend Stanislaw Przybyszewski’s 1896 novel Overboard,  in a direct response to The Scream Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Edvard Munch, , , , , , ,

Greg Cook’s Review for The Boston Phoenix of “I Wouldn’t Worry About It.” Verbatim.

I don’t know if this is like re-tweeting (but it’s not like there’s anything wrong with re-tweeting – hell, I’ve done it!), but in the interest of keeping the posts on this blog regular (and perhaps showing off?) I reproduce Greg Cook’s review of my show from the November 21st edition of the Boston Phoenix.  Without further ado: Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Reviews, , , , , , , , , ,

A Brief Interview for “I Wouldn’t Worry About It” at Laconia Gallery

Q.

A.  I want the work to serve as a mirror to everybody’s inner conflicts and demons.  Al art is in the end subjective.  Just because one person deals with anxiety and depression does not mean that the sharing of these ordeals through their art cannot, hopefully, bring comfort to those dealing with a different set of ordeals, be they other mood disorders or the general existential ennui that life dishes out on a regular basis. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Reviews

The (Partially Aborted) Munch Lecture: Part 3

In continuing the discussion of Munch as either a) paranoid misogynist, b) panderer to the rising trend of woman-bashing or c) a bit of both, it is notable to stress  again the paradox between his genuine paranoia; his frailty arising from his several heartbreaks and deaths of his mother and sister;  and his keen perception of cultural and literary trends instilling misogynistic fears in the (primarily male) public. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Edvard Munch, , , , , , , , , ,

Cheap Eats: The Cafeteria At The Short Term Unit At McLean Hospital

Food: Dining Out In*

A glorified version of food served in a hospital, which has absolutely
nothing to do with this entry other than by way of contrast . Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Levity,

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